Thesis on Social Learning Theory

The social learning theory has been the theoretical foundation for the majority of studies on sport socialization. To date, this perspective has been the most popular and most productive framework in both theory and empirical findings. In an effort to explain why people behave as they do, social learning theory emphasizes the prominent roles played by vicarious, symbolic, and self-regulatory processes in psychological functioning.

Human thought, affect, and behavior can be markedly influenced by observation, as well as by direct experience. Observational learning and modeling are vital for the social transmission process in which the language, lifestyles, and institutional practices of a culture are taught to new members. According to social learning theory, modeling influences produce learning principally through their informative function.

During exposure, observers acquire mainly symbolic representations of the modeled activities. The capacity to use symbols provides humans with a powerful means of interacting with their environment. Through verbal and imagined symbols people process and preserve experiences and representational forms that serve as guides for appropriate performance and future behavior.

In addition to the real models, such as parents and peers, the abundant and diverse symbolic modeling provided in television and other audio-visual displays is also an influential source of social learning. Social learning theory also emphasizes the prominent role of self-regulatory processes. People are not simple reactors to external influences. Individuals process and interpret the environment, and can exercise some influence over their own behavior.

Self-influence, therefore, partly determines which actions one performs. To be sure, the self-regulatory functions are created and occasionally supported by external influences. According to this theory, most behavior, including the learning of specific social roles, is acquired by observing the behavior of significant others, or role models, and regulated by reinforcement contingencies. One’s cultural background alone is “insufficient to explain the varied socialization outcomes that typically exist even in relatively homogeneous sub-cultures.

These differences occur because organizational prescriptions for conduct must be implemented by parents and other societal agents. For instance, “parents who, for whatever reason, do not subscribe to organizational sanction codes of behavior, and who themselves display deviant characteristics, generally produce children who are also deviant”. In most cases, the environment and personal determinants are only potential influences on behavior until actualized by appropriate actions.

Thus, behavior partly determines which of the many potential influences will come into play and what forms they will take; environmental influences, in turn, partly determine what types of behavior are developed and activated.

Thesis on Character Education in Mississippi

The techniques now practiced in teaching character education offer a temporary solution by Today’s society expects public schools to correct social problems with educators being directed to address the needs of their students.

In an effort to help prepare Mississippi’s children for the task of thinking critically to solve problems in conflict resolution, parenting, and the challenges of living in today’s complex society, the Mississippi legislators created House Bill 1467.

House Bill 1467 passed into law in 1994 requires that high schools in the state of Mississippi offer Family Dynamics classes to their students. During their regular legislative session, representatives and senators deemed it worthy to enact legislation that provided grades 10 through 12 in all school districts in Mississippi with Family and Consumer Science programs.

Their legislation also provided state funding for such programs and authorized school districts and community/junior college districts to apply for funding for Family and Consumer Sciences training programs. Section 1 of House Bill 1467, cited in the Mississippi Department of Education Resource Manual for Family Dynamics, also mandated that prior to July 1, 1997, all local school districts would provide programs of education in Family and Consumer Sciences for grades 10, 11, and 12 that would include course work in responsible parenting and family living skills.

According to the bill, programs are to include instruction that prepares students to assume responsibility for meeting the challenges of living in today’s complex society. Curriculum emphasis is placed on nutrition, emotional health, and physical health. An outgrowth of House Bill 1467 has been a Family and Consumer Sciences course entitled Family Dynamics.

The Family Dynamics curriculum focuses on teaching students to utilize skills in critical thinking, decision making, conflict management, communication, and resource management as they relate to personal development, understanding the family in today’s society, and parenting decisions and responsibilities.

The one-semester Family Dynamics course cannot solve the complex problems of society alone but can be a part of the solution by assisting students to understand the need for strong family units where individuals can develop in a healthy environment.

Thesis on the Importance of Feedback in Coaching

Listening skills have been recognized as a fragile connection in the flow of interactive communication. Demonstration of successful coaching strategies requires the coach to develop and utilize listening skills. The most effective coaches utilize listening to strengthen understanding of the environment.

Great coaches communicate in a way that allows a player to see the game differently than from the perspective of the action. Communication provides possibilities for action not available in the absence of coaching Feedback is accomplished by either written or oral information used in evaluating work activities. Functioning through difficulties requires the coach to be competent, to provide and accept constructive feedback. Whereas, constructive feedback contains both positive and negative information.

The recommendations of feedback should encourage personal development for the accepting subordinate. Feedback should, also, encourage changes in performance with minimum pressure or confusion when the subordinate decides to change the constructive feedback tool is used to improve performance and enhance the development of subordinates. Learning the techniques of dispensing and receiving feedback is demanding, time-consuming, and a continuing process. The obvious results, productivity improvement, performance improvement, and others, greatly exceed the time consumed in learning feedback techniques.

Coaches should utilize constructive feedback when providing subordinates with information about performance changes in relation to developed goals and strategies. An essential function within the coaching process requires managers to provide constructive feedback. When subordinates are provided with feedback on task-related performances, the acknowledgment can reinforce the results of goal setting. Performances appraised through feedback keeps goal-directed behavior focused toward accomplishing the task. Also, the feedback information keeps employees involved and should encourage them to strive harder to accomplish their goals.

The feedback should concentrate on observations, not assumptions. Correctly, managers should provide subordinates with specific examples gathered from the Dissemination of suggestions and/or other information is the nucleus for constructive feedback rather than dispensing advice. Consequently, investigating alternate methods promotes the expansion of subordinates’ horizons in which the appropriate conclusions to problems may be acquired. The coach or manager should emphasize the subordinate valid accomplishments, which were attained from the feedback provided.

The length of feedback information should be restricted to subordinates’ tolerance level. Employees may respond with an emotional reaction if the information is repeatedly dispensed at inappropriate times or places. Therefore, further dissemination of information should be terminated when emotional responses develop.

Thesis on the Symptoms of ADHD

ADHD is a neurological disorder of the executive features of the brain. ADHD people have difficulty with self regulation, concentration, and organisation. It stands for hyperactivity disorder of attention deficit (ADHD).

Symptoms of ADHD includes:

  • Lack of attention
  • Bad Time Control Management
  • Poor management of impulses
  • Exaggerated thoughts
  • Hyperfocus phenomenon
  • Overactivity
  • Dysfunction of executives

Symptoms of ADHD differ by person. Some or only any of the above symptoms can be encountered by you or your infant, along with those detailed in the DSM-V. ADHD is characterised by many patients and physicians as an iceberg, where most signs lie buried beneath the sea, out of sight but ever present. Take one of our free , confidential tests below to see whether you can get a formal diagnosis whether you believe you or a loved one may have ADHD.