Thesis on Changes in Medical Practice

Over time, social and technological changes have led to changes in medical practice and the erosion of a caring ethic. Too many patients, the image of a doctor is akin to a Norman Rockwell painting of the kind, gentle, fatherly man who makes house calls, patiently holds hands and seems intuitively attuned to his patients’ needs. Doctors, too, identify with this image as a role model.

But the world of the modern doctor is far removed from this idealized picture. Societal and technological factors have created complicated and impersonal health care settings and experiences for most patients and physicians. What Rockwell did capture was a sense of caring and trust between physicians and patient which many people considered and still consider the cornerstone of both a good relationship and good medical care.

The medical care he was depicting, representing the medical care in the 1940s, was often conducted in the private realm of the home. Patients were born there, had children and illnesses there and died there. People survived serious ailments, infections and disease with little or no assistance from medical technology, or died.

Physicians could not offer effective treatments for most diseases but they did try to alleviate suffering and pain. Physicians treated illnesses of entire families and extended families and very often had long-term inter-generational relationships with their patients. By the 1980s, however, the Rockwell image no longer pertained. Few patients were seen by family doctors and few, even within the same family, were seen by the same doctor.

The family physician providing home care had faded away and the close and inter-generational relationships were lost. One explanation for the changes in medical practice is found in the scientific and technological revolution that has and is occurring at academic medical centers (“AMCs”). AMCs with their research facilities, their hospitals, and their medical schools are the primary location for change in medical practice.

Thesis on Character Education in Mississippi

The techniques now practiced in teaching character education offer a temporary solution by Today’s society expects public schools to correct social problems with educators being directed to address the needs of their students.

In an effort to help prepare Mississippi’s children for the task of thinking critically to solve problems in conflict resolution, parenting, and the challenges of living in today’s complex society, the Mississippi legislators created House Bill 1467.

House Bill 1467 passed into law in 1994 requires that high schools in the state of Mississippi offer Family Dynamics classes to their students. During their regular legislative session, representatives and senators deemed it worthy to enact legislation that provided grades 10 through 12 in all school districts in Mississippi with Family and Consumer Science programs.

Their legislation also provided state funding for such programs and authorized school districts and community/junior college districts to apply for funding for Family and Consumer Sciences training programs. Section 1 of House Bill 1467, cited in the Mississippi Department of Education Resource Manual for Family Dynamics, also mandated that prior to July 1, 1997, all local school districts would provide programs of education in Family and Consumer Sciences for grades 10, 11, and 12 that would include course work in responsible parenting and family living skills.

According to the bill, programs are to include instruction that prepares students to assume responsibility for meeting the challenges of living in today’s complex society. Curriculum emphasis is placed on nutrition, emotional health, and physical health. An outgrowth of House Bill 1467 has been a Family and Consumer Sciences course entitled Family Dynamics.

The Family Dynamics curriculum focuses on teaching students to utilize skills in critical thinking, decision making, conflict management, communication, and resource management as they relate to personal development, understanding the family in today’s society, and parenting decisions and responsibilities.

The one-semester Family Dynamics course cannot solve the complex problems of society alone but can be a part of the solution by assisting students to understand the need for strong family units where individuals can develop in a healthy environment.

History of Women and Mentoring

Before the 1800s, the large majority of men and women in the United States worked in the same environment on the farm or in the family business. Although distinct, the roles of men and women in the family economy of this period were not vastly different.

In response to the American Industrial Revolution, men migrated from working at home to factories and offices, while women became full-time homemakers. Therefore, the woman’s role of homemaker and the man’s role of economic provider were separately defined and different values were attached to men’s work and women’s work.

Over time, the perception of the ownership of these respective roles became more rigidly entrenched in the national value system due to the relentless socialization of both men and women in their respective roles. If women ventured into factories or offices, their roles were perceived as support functions only, and thus they were placed in menial jobs with low pay, status, and power.

Quite the contrary, however, their male counterparts were considered and socialized as the decision-makers in the workplace. 2Although some women entered the labor force under these conditions during the 1800s and early 1900s, it was the onset of World War II that actively pressed massive numbers of women into the workforce. Both married and single women were urged to fill jobs vacated by men who were drafted or volunteered for the armed forces.

Not only did women prove to be highly capable of performing these jobs, but they also enjoyed doing and being paid for valued work. After World War II, women did not return to their previous primary roles as homemakers but rather remained in the workforce low paid low status, and powerless employees. As employees, they experienced both access and valuation discrimination.

In the 1960s, women from all walks of life helped establish the National Organization for Women. Their vision included equal employment opportunities and an end to inequities in the workplace. Also during the 1960s, the Civil Rights Act, the Equal Pay Act, and the doctrine of Comparable Worth were implemented to address both access and valuation discrimination. As a result of legal intervention to ensure equal rights of women in the workforce, women not only entered into the workplace in unprecedentedly large numbers but also had access (though limited) to all types of professions.

Thesis on the Importance of Feedback in Coaching

Listening skills have been recognized as a fragile connection in the flow of interactive communication. Demonstration of successful coaching strategies requires the coach to develop and utilize listening skills. The most effective coaches utilize listening to strengthen understanding of the environment.

Great coaches communicate in a way that allows a player to see the game differently than from the perspective of the action. Communication provides possibilities for action not available in the absence of coaching Feedback is accomplished by either written or oral information used in evaluating work activities. Functioning through difficulties requires the coach to be competent, to provide and accept constructive feedback. Whereas, constructive feedback contains both positive and negative information.

The recommendations of feedback should encourage personal development for the accepting subordinate. Feedback should, also, encourage changes in performance with minimum pressure or confusion when the subordinate decides to change the constructive feedback tool is used to improve performance and enhance the development of subordinates. Learning the techniques of dispensing and receiving feedback is demanding, time-consuming, and a continuing process. The obvious results, productivity improvement, performance improvement, and others, greatly exceed the time consumed in learning feedback techniques.

Coaches should utilize constructive feedback when providing subordinates with information about performance changes in relation to developed goals and strategies. An essential function within the coaching process requires managers to provide constructive feedback. When subordinates are provided with feedback on task-related performances, the acknowledgment can reinforce the results of goal setting. Performances appraised through feedback keeps goal-directed behavior focused toward accomplishing the task. Also, the feedback information keeps employees involved and should encourage them to strive harder to accomplish their goals.

The feedback should concentrate on observations, not assumptions. Correctly, managers should provide subordinates with specific examples gathered from the Dissemination of suggestions and/or other information is the nucleus for constructive feedback rather than dispensing advice. Consequently, investigating alternate methods promotes the expansion of subordinates’ horizons in which the appropriate conclusions to problems may be acquired. The coach or manager should emphasize the subordinate valid accomplishments, which were attained from the feedback provided.

The length of feedback information should be restricted to subordinates’ tolerance level. Employees may respond with an emotional reaction if the information is repeatedly dispensed at inappropriate times or places. Therefore, further dissemination of information should be terminated when emotional responses develop.