Thesis: Importance of Brand Loyalty

Sample Thesis Paper

The development of Brand Loyalty allows manufacturers to draw consumers away from competing brands and increase purchase trends for their own brands (Zeithaml, Rust and Lemon 2001). However, brand loyalty has two-fold effects since it is very likely that once a customer has developed loyalty towards a brand, the loyal customer will suggest the same brand to a prospective customer (Timm 2007).

Thesis on Social Learning Theory

The social learning theory has been the theoretical foundation for the majority of studies on sport socialization. To date, this perspective has been the most popular and most productive framework in both theory and empirical findings. In an effort to explain why people behave as they do, social learning theory emphasizes the prominent roles played by vicarious, symbolic, and self-regulatory processes in psychological functioning.

Human thought, affect, and behavior can be markedly influenced by observation, as well as by direct experience. Observational learning and modeling are vital for the social transmission process in which the language, lifestyles, and institutional practices of a culture are taught to new members. According to social learning theory, modeling influences produce learning principally through their informative function.

During exposure, observers acquire mainly symbolic representations of the modeled activities. The capacity to use symbols provides humans with a powerful means of interacting with their environment. Through verbal and imagined symbols people process and preserve experiences and representational forms that serve as guides for appropriate performance and future behavior.

In addition to the real models, such as parents and peers, the abundant and diverse symbolic modeling provided in television and other audio-visual displays is also an influential source of social learning. Social learning theory also emphasizes the prominent role of self-regulatory processes. People are not simple reactors to external influences. Individuals process and interpret the environment, and can exercise some influence over their own behavior.

Self-influence, therefore, partly determines which actions one performs. To be sure, the self-regulatory functions are created and occasionally supported by external influences. According to this theory, most behavior, including the learning of specific social roles, is acquired by observing the behavior of significant others, or role models, and regulated by reinforcement contingencies. One’s cultural background alone is “insufficient to explain the varied socialization outcomes that typically exist even in relatively homogeneous sub-cultures.

These differences occur because organizational prescriptions for conduct must be implemented by parents and other societal agents. For instance, “parents who, for whatever reason, do not subscribe to organizational sanction codes of behavior, and who themselves display deviant characteristics, generally produce children who are also deviant”. In most cases, the environment and personal determinants are only potential influences on behavior until actualized by appropriate actions.

Thus, behavior partly determines which of the many potential influences will come into play and what forms they will take; environmental influences, in turn, partly determine what types of behavior are developed and activated.

Thesis on Changes in Medical Practice

Over time, social and technological changes have led to changes in medical practice and the erosion of a caring ethic. Too many patients, the image of a doctor is akin to a Norman Rockwell painting of the kind, gentle, fatherly man who makes house calls, patiently holds hands and seems intuitively attuned to his patients’ needs. Doctors, too, identify with this image as a role model.

But the world of the modern doctor is far removed from this idealized picture. Societal and technological factors have created complicated and impersonal health care settings and experiences for most patients and physicians. What Rockwell did capture was a sense of caring and trust between physicians and patient which many people considered and still consider the cornerstone of both a good relationship and good medical care.

The medical care he was depicting, representing the medical care in the 1940s, was often conducted in the private realm of the home. Patients were born there, had children and illnesses there and died there. People survived serious ailments, infections and disease with little or no assistance from medical technology, or died.

Physicians could not offer effective treatments for most diseases but they did try to alleviate suffering and pain. Physicians treated illnesses of entire families and extended families and very often had long-term inter-generational relationships with their patients. By the 1980s, however, the Rockwell image no longer pertained. Few patients were seen by family doctors and few, even within the same family, were seen by the same doctor.

The family physician providing home care had faded away and the close and inter-generational relationships were lost. One explanation for the changes in medical practice is found in the scientific and technological revolution that has and is occurring at academic medical centers (“AMCs”). AMCs with their research facilities, their hospitals, and their medical schools are the primary location for change in medical practice.

Thesis: Early Philosophy of Customer Loyalty

Sample Thesis Paper

Customer loyalty is now recognized as being undisputedly necessary for an organization if long-term success is to be achieved. A concept that prevailed to quite an extent in earlier years of development of the corporate environment was that product price and quality were the only two prime factors that were to be considered to hold any degree of significance if a product was to be a success (Barlow 2009).

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